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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 60-65

Malaria elimination in Sri Lanka


1 Department of Biology, McGill University; Institute for the Study of International Development, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
2 McGill International TB Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
3 Institute for the Study of International Development, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
4 Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
5 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
6 School of Environment, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
7 Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Correspondence Address:
Julia Nicole Simac
McGill University, 845 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0G4
Canada
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DOI: 10.4103/jhs.JHS_25_17

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Sri Lanka was declared malaria-free on 5 September 2016 by the World Health Organization. This success was the result of over a century of efforts that combined disease surveillance, vector control and treatment. By 2008, there was zero mortality from indigenous cases, and the country witnessed its last indigenous case in 2012. This process involved long-term, sustained financial support, particularly from the Sri Lankan Government, the World Bank and the Global Fund. Given that malaria is still a global health burden, there is much to be learnt from Sri Lanka's achievement in the ongoing efforts to reach a malaria-free world.


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